Thursday, July 24, 2014

Terry's Tiny Tour: Brad Heppner's Extraordinary Design in Morningside / Lenox Park

This house moved me. It's for sale but it's expensive. It's a sculpture with breathtaking yet comfortable public spaces and with cozy, quiet private spaces. French Normandy? Glen Mercutt? Edwin Lutyens? Charles Voysey? Zen? Yes?



Brad said they studied the rhythm and scale of the street, developed the twin gables, started with a cube in the front and a cube in the back, connected the cubes with a "service" area, then began sculpting, creating axes and enfilades, removing the unnecessary.

Brad makes it sound easy and routine doesn't he?

IMG_9194 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner
All four sides of the house are interesting.

I met architect Brad Heppner by blogging this house in 2009: "White and Pointy - 80 Years Apart." That blog led to three visits to this house including yesterday when Brad spoke about it.

IMG_9231 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner speaking
Brad spoke to agents and brokers yesterday. That's Brad standing on the right with jacket.

I looked at the ad copy and pictures. I can't do much better.

Let me give you two tiny video tours of the private spaces. I like them so much.

The master suite included a modest bedchamber. The cove ceiling makes it uncannily quiet. I start in the public space. If you can't see the master suite video below, please click here.


Extraordinary. If you can't see the master suite video above, please click here.

The children's and guest bedrooms are upstairs surrounding a daylight lounge and study space. If you can't see the child/guest bedroom suite video below, please click here.

Extraordinary. If you can't see the child/guest bedroom suite video above, please click here.

Thanks to Brad and to Bob Glascock for inviting me.

P.S.
B-shre-Pre-Teardown-Heppner Berkshire teardown before
Before.

IMG_9233 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner
After.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Please Repeat: A House That Took My Breath Away

I can't get it out of my head and I don't want to. Last weekend I toured one of our region's greatest places, an antebellum private house. I never expected to see it and don't expect to see it again.

It was alive that afternoon with family guests dining at temporary tables in the library, a picked over pot luck buffet in the dining room, multiple plastic coolers on the front porch, a dozen performers packing up in the parlor, exchange students playing the out-of-tune piano. Sheets covered some shoved together furniture anticipating a garage sale. Joe and I chatted with our host in the foyer, as grand and as comfortable as a room could be. And there wasn't one spec of decorator-show-house, not that I could see.

All this life where folks have lived continually for 100+ years, I was quite moved.

We continue to build mansions by the boatload. Why not build them just like this?

It reminds me of my favorite room in Atlanta, the L.P. Grant Mansion's drawing room:


Please repeat.

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